Plato’s Works

Plato’s Works

June 27, 2021 Off By Felso

Plato left behind more than thirty works, almost all of which were written in the form of dialogue. There is no work that has not survived to the present day, although it has been referred to in ancient or medieval sources (Copleston, 1998: 13).

There is no doubt that almost all of the works that have a predominant place in Platonic thought belong to Plato, although some fake dialogues were written over time, which did not belong to Plato but were attributed to him.

Although it is difficult to determine the order of priority and succession of his works that have survived to the present day, it is possible to group them in a certain way considering the features of the language used in his works, the course of development of his thoughts, and the references in various sources.

Socratic Period Artifacts

These are works that he wrote in his youth and directly reflect the influences of his teacher, Socrates.

Defense,
criton,
ion,
Laches,
Charmids,
euthyphron,
Lysis
The 1st Book of the State

is in this group.

“The State” is one of the Socratic Period Works.
Transition Period Works

These are the works where he got rid of the influence of his teacher and started to develop his own original views.

Protagoras,
Gorgias,
meno,
Euthydemus
Kratylos

is in this group.

“Gorgias” is one of the Transitional Period Works.
Works of Maturity Period

These are the works in which Plato’s original philosophical views are written in a rich language and the Platonic discourse reaches its climax.

symposium,
phaidone,
State
Phædrus

is in this group.

“Phaidon” is one of the Maturity Period Works.
Old Age Works

It is the last period of Plato’s works in which he attempted to test and question his teachings from various aspects.

Theaetetus,
Parmenides,
sophist,
Person of govement,
Philebos,
Timaios
laws

is in this group.

Note: This order includes only the major works of Plato, and determining the exact order of the works is still controversial.

Prepared by: Sociologist Ömer YILDIRIM
Source: Omer YILDIRIM’s Personal Lecture Notes. Atatürk University Sociology Department 1st Year “Introduction to Philosophy” and 2nd, 3rd, 4th Grade “History of Philosophy” Lecture Notes (Ömer YILDIRIM); Open Education Philosophy Textbook