The Life and Works of Jean Jacques Rousseau

The Life and Works of Jean Jacques Rousseau

June 27, 2021 Off By Felso

Jean-Jacques Rousseau (Geneva 28 June, 1712 – Ermononville, Val-d’Oise 2 July 1778) was a French writer, thinker, philosopher, political and music theorist.

Born in Geneva, Switzerland. The son of an artist, Rousseau began his education at the age of ten with a clergyman, later working with an engraver master. Between 1728 and 1738, he worked as a butler, secretary, music teacher and translator in France, Italy and Switzerland. When his writings were banned in France, he went to England at the invitation of his friend, David Hume, with whom they fell apart. He later took refuge in Neuchatel in western Switzerland. He was baptized as a Calvinist, converted to Catholicism in Turin, and later became a Calvinist again. He wrote the music section of the Encyclopedia in 1749.

He is a famous French thinker who gained fame with his analysis of human nature, the idea that the natural state of man, unaltered by civilization, is superior in many respects, and the social contract doctrine that forms the basis of modern democracy. He has always rejected the title of philosopher.

Major Works

– Du Contract Social

– Les Rêveries du promeneur solitaire (Dreams of the Lone Wanderer)

– Les Confessions (Confessions)

– Discours sur les Sciences et les Arts (Speech on the Sciences and Arts),

– Discours sur l’Origin et les Fondements de l’Ingalité parmi les hommes (The Basis and Origins of Human Inequality),

– émile au de l’éducation (Emile or On Education), nouvelle heloise

– Du Contract Social,

– Les Confessions (Confessions)

– Lettre a D’Alembert sur les spectacles (Letter to d’Alembert on Theater Plays)

– Julie ou la Nouvelle Héloise (Julie or the new Heloise)

– Les Rêveries du promeneur solitaire (Dreams of the Lone Wanderer)

Prepared by: Sociologist Ömer YILDIRIM
Source: Omer YILDIRIM’s Personal Lecture Notes. Atatürk University Sociology Department 1st Year “Introduction to Philosophy” and 2nd, 3rd, 4th Grade “History of Philosophy” Lecture Notes (Ömer YILDIRIM); Open Education Philosophy Textbook