THOMAS HOBBES AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF MORTAL (ETHICS)

THOMAS HOBBES AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF MORTAL (ETHICS)

June 28, 2021 Off By Felso

He contributed significantly to the emergence of ethics from the influence of apocalyptic theology and the teleological world or anthropomorphic view of nature to become an autonomous discipline of philosophy.

Freeing moral philosophy from the influence of religion or theology, Hobbes, as a typical modern thinker, subordinated him to science, and if ethics were to be a sound and reliable knowledge of human moral actions, his true purpose, and moral facts, he would rely on tradition, religious worldview, or the authority of the church. He claimed that it had to be based on the objective laws of psychology and biology, rather than

Hobbes, who suggested that moral rules and principles should be seen as subjective expressions of feelings and desires, rather than the specification of objectively verifiable laws, said that the preservation and continuation of life is the sole and main purpose of human action, and his ethical view is the urge to preserve and maintain this self-existence. He built it on his effort, inclination, or will.

The tendency for self-preservation, from which Hobbes attempts to derive all moral rules, laws and obligations, finds its expression either in the desire for social peace to be realized through institutions and practices that preserve and protect the peace, or in the aggressive actions of the individual, tending to protect one’s own self-interest. .

The only thing that will determine which of these will be valid is whether man will find himself in a well-ordered, harmonious society that makes morality possible, or in a state of nature that makes morality impossible.

SOURCE

Ahmet Cevizci; Paradigm Philosophy Dictionary