What is Fatalism? Fatalism, Fatalism

What is Fatalism? Fatalism, Fatalism

June 28, 2021 Off By Felso

It is possible to answer the question of what is fatalism as follows: Fatalism; It is a philosophy movement that argues that everything is predetermined by a supernatural power and that no one can change this destiny.

Fatalism or fatalism is a view in philosophy that believes that all events are predetermined by fate and that they will not change. The worldview that believes that everything is predetermined according to destiny and that people cannot change this predetermined destiny is called fatalism.

Fatalism; Jabriye, also known as fatalism, fatalism or fixed-fatalism, is the view that claims that everything is predetermined by a supernatural power and that no one can change this determined destiny. Whether a person wants it or not, events develop in the direction of a will other than his own will, and no matter how much effort a person makes with his will, the result always comes true according to that will on him.

FATALISM’S UNDERSTANDING OF FREEDOM

The individual is not free due to his predestined destiny for fatalism, so there is no sense of responsibility and understanding in fatalism. According to fatalism, people cannot control events. Even if they already know what’s going to happen to them, they can’t change it.

Contrary to determinism, in fatalism the future of man is entirely dependent on events. According to the understanding of fatalism, whether people want it or not, events develop in the direction of a will other than their own will, and no matter how much effort a person puts into his will, the result always takes place according to that will on him.

Fatalism does not accept determinism and the rule of causality and that human will is free. According to this understanding, man is obliged to commit good deeds and sins, so that responsibility is eliminated. All human actions are regulated by another will.

For fatalism, man is not free.
FATALISM AND THE PRESENCE OF GOD

For fatalism, there is no will except the will of God, and the will in man is the manifestation of God’s will. According to this situation, everything that beings do from eternity to eternity is an automatic activity, and beings become automatons, puppets.

While accepting the existence of God, neo-spiritualists who accept that the rule of causality is valid in the universe and that souls determine their development with their free will within the requirements of divine will laws, do not see fatalism as a way of truth.

According to this understanding, man is obliged to commit good deeds and sins, so that responsibility is eliminated. All human actions are regulated by another will. In other words, there is no will except the will of God.

In this context, it is necessary to strictly distinguish fatalism or theological determinism from scientific determinism. Fatalism has taken various forms over the centuries; The evolution of fatalism is related to its opposite concept, the idea of ​​freedom.

FATALISM and STOCAISM

According to many ancient teachings, events were governed by necessity (anagke) or fate (fatum). Necessity or fate were also mysterious and dominating forces to which even the gods bowed. This omnipotent destiny was evident in the ancient philosophies, especially in the Stoics, as in the Greek tragedy.

According to the Stoics, human beings could not change external events. The only way out of fate was to accept the facts (“fate drives those who resist, but drives those who consent”). Freedom, then, was seen entirely as an inner truth. With Christianity and belief in God’s wisdom, this issue became all the more difficult because it was necessary to accept that in human behavior there is freedom of choice and decision, and therefore man deserves salvation or damnation. So it was imperative to reconcile human power. Many solutions have been found to this theological problem.

Plotinos says that God predestines to be free, Thommaso of Aquino says that God is eternal, that he sees everything, even the future, and therefore also the future actions of man, that the situation does not change even if these are freely decided, Malebranche, God “on the occasion” of our decision. claimed to have had an effect. Predestination theories, however, sacrificed freedom to the wisdom of God.

With the development of scientific thinking, fatalism receded in the face of scientific determinism. Because scientific determinism sought to learn these in order to better overcome the imperatives of nature. Necessity, once learned, turned into freedom from being fate, as Spinoza pointed out. So there was no such thing as an unpredictable irrational absolute; so there was no question of blind fate. The coincidence, which is the last refuge of the ancient concept of destiny, is gradually turning into statistical calculation.

WHAT IS PRINTING?

Fatalism is the understanding that suggests that the universe and man are predetermined. People who are deprived of scientific knowledge, see all that is happening under the control of a superior power.