What is Relativistic Thoughtism, and What Does It Mean?

What is Relativistic Thoughtism, and What Does It Mean?

July 1, 2021 Off By Felso

A thoughtful interpretation of relativism. “Relativism, combined with the ignorance of dialectics, ultimately leads to idealism”. This means that dialectical relativism must deny the reality of nature independent of human consciousness. Objective reality is to exist outside of human consciousness and independently of it. This knowledge distinguishes dialectical relativism from idealistic relativism. In order to indicate this distinction in terms, in recent years, there has been a tendency in Turkish to call the dialectical understanding of relativism relativism and the idealist understanding relativism. In fact, both terms are synonymous. Reflective relativism, devoid of dialectical logic, is accustomed to thinking with the formal logic of Aristotle. According to this logic, something either exists or does not exist, it cannot exist in relation to it, to say it exists relatively means that it does not actually exist. For example, Einstein said that time, space, and matter exist in relation to each other. This means that timeless space, spaceless time, time (matter without space and time without matter) space are unthinkable. Relativist thought interprets this relevance as their absence and delusion. However, absolute truth consists of relative truths.

The relativity of our knowledge does not mean the denial of objective reality, but the degree to which our knowledge approaches this reality historically. “In terms of contemporary materialism, the approximate closeness of our knowledge to the absolute objective reality is historically relative, but the existence of this fact is not. Just as the approximate suitability of the picture to the model is relative, but the existence of the picture is not relative, it is real. In history we will discover our knowledge of objects alizarin in coal or electrons in atoms. It is relative historically that we have advanced so far, but it is by no means relative that each such discovery constitutes an advance in purely objective knowledge. J. Dietzegen also said: “Absolute truth can be heard, smelled, touched, and of course known. But it is not fully involved in knowledge. It is certain that he is far from exactly repeating the painter’s model, how can he coincide (?correspond? and no doubt about …” That approximation is relativity. But this relativity does not abolish the objective existence of the table (or model N.).

“Once man bases his theory of knowledge (idealist N.) on relativism, he necessarily condemns himself to skepticism, agnosticism and sophism, or subjectivism. Any fallacy can be justified in terms of non-dialectical relativism”.