Who is Anakharsis?

Who is Anakharsis?

December 13, 2020 Off By Felso

The Scythian philosopher Anakharsis, named among the Seven Sages, was the son of Gnuros and the brother of the Scythian king Kaduidas. Anakharsis was bilingual because his mother was Greek. Writing eight hundred lines on war and the simplicity of life, he compared Scythian and Greek habits.

According to Socrates, Anakharsis went to Athens towards the forty-seventh Olympiad (towards 588). Diogenes Laertios writes the following about him: “According to what Hermippos told, he wanted to see Solon. He asked Solon’s servants to go and tell their master that Anakharsis was at the door, wishing to be his guest. The maid went to consult and received orders from Solon to report the following answer: he could only accept his compatriots as guests. Anakharsis replied that he was in his homeland in Greece and could be accepted as a guest. Solon admired this clever answer. Anakharsis later returned to his country and wanted to change the habits in his country because he was passionate about Greek habits. But his brother shot and killed him in the hunt. As he died he said: ‘I survived in Greece with my intelligence, in my country I am dying because of greed.’Others say that he was killed while worshiping according to Greek religious rules. ” Diogenes Laertios writes the following emotional quatrain upon the death of Anakharsis: “Anakharsis returned to Scythian after long journeys / To keep everyone alive according to Greek customs. / Words were just beginning to come out of his mouth, / A cruel arrow sent him to the land of the immortals.

Diogenes Laertios gives us information about his wisdom. This saying was from Anakharsis: “There are three clusters in the vine: one cluster of delight, the second cluster of drunkenness, the third cluster of regret.” They asked Anakharsis how to learn to be content with less, he said, “See the disgusting face of the drunkards.” Anakharsis was a bit naive, for example, when he learned that a ship’s hull was four fingers thick, he was surprised, he said how could such a thin thing protect sailors from death. He was very surprised. He was also surprised that those who prohibit lying lie openly in the tavern and the Greeks at the beginning of the feasts with small cups and drinks at the end of the feasts, that is, when they were thoroughly drunk. He said to someone who condemned his being Scythian: “If my homeland is a matter of shame to me, then you are a shame for yourself.” They asked him:what does man have both good and bad? His language, he replied. He described the agora as the place where people mutually pitted each other and became rich by theft. He told a young man who had a disbelief at a banquet: “My young friend, if you can’t handle wine at a young age, you will have to drink water in your old age.” Anakharsis wrote the following letter to the Lydian king Croesus (Croesus): “King of Lydia, I came to Greece to learn about Greek customs and habits. I don’t need gold. If I am more competent when I return to Scythian it will be enough for me to be happy. However, I will go to Sardes and be happy to visit you. “”Young friend, if you can’t stand the wine at a young age, you will have to drink water in your old age.” Anakharsis wrote the following letter to the Lydian king Croesus (Croesus): “King of Lydia, I came to Greece to learn about Greek customs and habits. I don’t need gold. If I am more competent when I return to Scythian it will be enough for me to be happy. However, I will go to Sardes and be happy to visit you. “”Young friend, if you can’t stand the wine at a young age, you will have to drink water in your old age.” Anakharsis wrote the following letter to the Lydian king Croesus (Croesus): “King of Lydia, I came to Greece to learn about Greek customs and habits. I don’t need gold. If I am more competent when I return to Scythian it will be enough for me to be happy. However, I will go to Sardes and be happy to visit you. “

Prepared by:  Sociologist Ömer YILDIRIM
Source: Ömer YILDIRIM’s Personal Lecture Notes. Atatürk University Department of Sociology First Class “Introduction to Philosophy” and 2., 3., 4. Class “History of Philosophy” Lecture Notes (Ömer YILDIRIM); Open Education Philosophy Textbook