Who is Friedrich Ludwig Gottlob Frege?

Who is Friedrich Ludwig Gottlob Frege?

June 25, 2021 Off By Felso

Friedrich Ludwig Frege, who lived between 8 November 1848 – 26 July 1925, was a German mathematician, logician and philosopher who is considered the founder of modern mathematical logic and analytical philosophy.

Frege is a mathematician who shifted the focus of his work to logic and, by extension, philosophy. Some consider him to be the founder of analytical philosophy. The works he did during his lifetime were not recognized except in a narrow circle. His work on the foundations of mathematics and logic was handed down to future generations by Giuseppe Peano (1858-1932) and Bertrand Russell (1872-1970).

Wittgenstein praised Frege’s work in the Tractatus. On the other hand, Grundlagen der Arithmetik, one of Frege’s most important works, was only translated into English in 1950. Interest in Frege’s work increased in the 1960s, and after the 1970s, some of Frege’s works became standard reading texts for a student studying analytical philosophy.

Frege was born in Wismar, located in Mecklenburg-Schwerin (today Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Federated State, Germany) in 1848. Her father was the founder and director of a girls’ high school. After her father’s death, her mother continued the same business. He had the opportunity to encounter language and logic issues from his childhood. One of the important reasons for this was a textbook written by his father on the German language for children aged 9 to 13. The introduction to this book was about the logic of language.

Frege began his studies at the University of Jena in 1869. In the first four semesters, he attended about 20 lessons, especially on physics and mathematics. Among the courses he took were philosophy courses. From 1871 Frege decided to continue his studies in Göttingen. He completed his doctorate in 1873 under Ernst Schering. His doctoral thesis was entitled Über eine geometrische Darstellung der imaginären Gabilde in der Ebene (Geometric Representation of Imaginary Forms on the Plane). In this work, Frege was trying to solve a problem in projective geometry. The problem was about representing points at infinite distance. Frege began teaching mathematics after earning his doctorate. He became an associate professor of mathematics in 1879 and a professor in 1896. Frege married Margarete Katharina Sophia Anna Lieseberg in 1887. He continued his academic studies until 1918. He died in Bad Kleinen in 1925.

Frege devoted most of his academic work, from 1874 to 1918, for a single purpose. To put arithmetic on a solid foundation by reducing it to logic. From his Begriffsschrift (Concept Paper), which he published in 1879, to the letter Russell sent to him in 1906, which showed that the system he established contained a paradox, he made efforts almost entirely for this purpose.

He was born in Wismar. He began his studies at the University of Jena in 1869 and moved to Göttingen two years later, where he received his Doctor of Philosophy in 1873. Two years later he returned to Jena and began teaching mathematics. He became an associate professor of mathematics in 1879 and a professor in 1896. He died in Bad Kleinen in 1925.

Frege devoted most of his academic work, which lasted from 1874 to 1918, for a single purpose: to put arithmetic on a solid foundation by reducing it to logic. Frege’s project of reducing arithmetic to the logical involves both describing the numbers one by one and capturing the order of the numbers. Frege also wrote in his 1884 work on the foundations of arithmetic (Die Grundlagen der Arithmetik, eine logischmatematische Untersuchung über den Begriff der Zahl ) and in his work on the basic laws of arithmetic, which he published in the first and only volume in 1893 (Die Grundgeseztze der Tek (Die Grundgeseztze der Arithmetik) ; eng. cardinal) tried to reveal how numbers can be derived from pure logic. As a result of these studies, Frege tried to represent all true propositions related to arithmetic in a formal system.

Perhaps Frege’s most important impact on the development of philosophy of language was the distinction he made between Sinn (“meaning”) and Bedeutung (“reference”, also translated as “reference” or “direction”). In his article titled “Über Sinn und Bedeutung” written in 1892, Frege presented meaning and reference as two different aspects that determine the way an expression indicates. Frege spoke of the reference of proper names in the first stage. The object with that name itself constitutes the reference of the name. Later, however, he also used reference for expressions other than the noun. For example, according to Frege, the reference of a proposition (news sentence) is the truth value of the proposition in question. The meaning of the proposition is the thought expressed by the proposition in question. The meaning of an expression is the presentation form of the referenced object.

Whether certain identifiers have similar references to proper names; whether the posting should be based on meaning